Scalloped cast on

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I saw a link to a phototutorial for making this cast on on Pinterest, so I tried it out for knitting and Tunisian crochet.

Pretty cool, isn’t it? I wish I could credit the original instructions for it; the page linked from Pinterest was using photos that had a watermark for a Russian LJ blog, but I couldn’t find the original there, either.

Summary:

  1. Using a long-tail cast on, cast ten stitches onto a knitting needle and crochet hook held together.
  2. Yarn over the crochet hook, and pull the loop through those ten stitches, holding the hook against the needle so it doesn’t catch on anything.
  3. Slip all ten stitches off the knitting needle.
  4. Slip the new stitch from the hook to the needle.
  5. Slip the original tenth stitch back onto the needle and pull on the yarn to create a scallop.

This all creates two stitches for now, but you’ll add three more on the next row, so each scallop counts as five stitches cast on. Repeat as desired and turn.

I picked up and knit a stitch from the corner of the end scallop, and liked the effect.

This is as shown in the tutorial: knit one of the cast on stitches, then cast on three stitches. (I like to do three yarn overs and then knit through the back loops on the next row to twist them, as in my blog post about dealing with multiple yarn overs.) Knit the second cast on stitch and repeat to the end.

Since I’d picked up and knit a stitch from the corner of the end stitch, I did the same at this end, so it would match.

I thought I’d try it with Tunisian crochet, and it came out beautifully. Where the knit version has a larger knitting needle and smaller crochet hook, I switched things around for the Tunisian crochet since the stitches needed to end up on the hook.

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Each scallop has two loops. Work the first loop you come to as usual, then chain two (where the knit version of this has cast on three) then work the next loop. Work to the end, and voila!

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4 thoughts on “Scalloped cast on

    1. Naomi Parkhurst Post author

      Without seeing a picture, I’m having a hard time imagining what’s happening.

      What happens after knitting a row or two after casting on? Sometimes things don’t look right until they’re in the larger context. (This is a general question that’s not specific to this cast-on).

      If you can post a picture somewhere (not Facebook), then I might be able to figure it out by looking.

      Reply

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