Have you seen this stitch pattern before?

Name That Stitch Pattern: have you seen it before?

This is a ground pattern based on a standard sequence that’s often seen in lace—Barbara Walker remarks upon it. I don’t remember seeing this exact version before, though I have seen one called Alternating Feather that repeats Rows 1&2 several times, and then Rows 3&4 several times. I suppose this probably means that I just haven’t looked in the right places (or that I’ve seen it, but don’t remember it). Are you familiar with it?

I came up with it by playing with lace and sequence knitting. Anyway, I like it and it seemed worth sharing, though it is not in itself sequence knitting. (It turns out that there are extra complications that come with trying to work sequences as lace. Fascinating, but it makes it more difficult.)

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flower made from Elf vehicle, motif

Book Review: KNITSONIK Stranded Colourwork Sourcebook

A couple of weeks ago, I mentioned this book in the same post as Sequence Knitting, then went on to only review the latter. Now it’s this book’s turn.

KNITSONIK Stranded Colourwork Sourcebook, by Felicity Ford. KNITSONIK, 2014. ISBN: 978-0993041501. Website: knitsonik.com. Ravelry group: KNITSONIK

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Megabat: a free stitch pattern. (Variation on Fruitbat)

Megabat: a free lace knitting stitch pattern (Fruitbat variation)

I love the way Fruitbat came out, but I couldn’t help playing with it. This version of it isn’t secret code anymore (because of the particular way I messed with the relative locations of the yarnovers and changed which was row 1), but I love it too, in a different way. Megabat is another name for fruit bats.

Megabat: free lace knitting stitch pattern, variation on Fruitbat.(Click to enlarge)

Pattern repeat is a multiple of 10 stitches and 44 rows.

Abbreviation key:

  • 1/1 LC: Slip next stitch to cable needle and place at front of work, knit 1, then knit 1 from cable needle.
  • 1/1 RC: Slip next stitch to cable needle and place at back of work, knit 1, then knit 1 from cable needle.
  • k: knit.
  • k2tog: knit 2 stitches together as if they were 1. (Right-leaning decrease)
  • k3tog: knit 3 stitches together as if they were 1. (Right-leaning double decrease)
  • p: purl.
  • ssk: slip each of the next 2 stitches as if to knit, then knit them together through the back loop. (Left-leaning decrease)
  • sssk: slip each of the next 3 stitches as if to knit, then knit them together through the back loop. (Left-leaning double decrease)
  • yo: yarn over.

I’ve made a stitch map for Megabat, as well as a printable PDF.
Row 1: Ssk, yo x 2, ssk, *1/1 RC, k2tog, yo x 2, k2tog, ssk, yo x 2, ssk , rep from *, 1/1 RC, k2tog, yo x 2, k2tog.
Row 2: P1, k1, p3, *p2, k1, p7 , rep from *, p2, k1, p2.
Row 3: Ssk, yo, k1, k2tog, yo, *yo, ssk, k1, yo, k2tog, ssk, yo, k1, k2tog, yo , rep from *, yo, ssk, k1, yo, k2tog.
Row 4: P4, k1, *p9, k1 , rep from *, p5.
Row 5: Yo, k1, k3tog, yo, k1, *k1, yo, sssk, k1, yo x 2, k1, k3tog, yo, k1 , rep from *, k1, yo, sssk, k1, yo.
Row 6: P5, *p4, k1, p5 , rep from *, p5.
Row 7: K1, (yo, k2tog) x 2, *(ssk, yo) x 2, k2, (yo, k2tog) x 2 , rep from *, (ssk, yo) x 2, k1.
Row 8: Purl.
Row 9: K3, k2tog, yo, *yo, ssk, k6, k2tog, yo , rep from *, yo, ssk, k3.
Row 10: Repeat row 4.
Row 11: K1, k2tog, yo, ssk, yo, *yo, k2tog, yo, ssk, k2, k2tog, yo, ssk, yo , rep from *, yo, k2tog, yo, ssk, k1.
Row 12: Repeat row 4.
Row 13: Yo, k2tog, k1, 1/1 LC, *1/1 RC, k1, ssk, yo x 2, k2tog, k1, 1/1 LC , rep from *, 1/1 RC, k1, ssk, yo.
Row 14: Repeat row 6.
Row 15: K1, yo, ssk, k1, *1/1 RC, k1, k2tog, yo, k2, yo, ssk, k1 , rep from *, 1/1 RC, k1, k2tog, yo, k1.
Row 16: Purl.
Row 17: Ssk, yo x 2, ssk, k1, *k1, k2tog, yo x 2, k2tog, ssk, yo x 2, ssk, k1 , rep from *, k1, k2tog, yo x 2, k2tog.
Row 18: P1, k1, p3, *p2, (k1, p3) x 2 , rep from *, p2, k1, p2.
Row 19: K3, yo, ssk, *k2tog, yo, k6, yo, ssk , rep from *, k2tog, yo, k3.
Row 20: Purl.
Row 21: K4, *(1/1 RC, k3) x 2 , rep from *, 1/1 RC, k4.
Row 22: Purl.
Row 23: K1, k2tog, yo x 2, k2tog, *ssk, yo x 2, ssk, 1/1 RC, k2tog, yo x 2, k2tog , rep from *, ssk, yo x 2, ssk, k1.
Row 24: P2, k1, p2, *p1, k1, p5, k1, p2 , rep from *, p1, k1, p3.
Row 25: Yo, ssk, k1, yo, k2tog, *ssk, yo, k1, k2tog, yo x 2, ssk, k1, yo, k2tog , rep from *, ssk, yo, k1, k2tog, yo.
Row 26: Repeat row 6.
Row 27: K1, yo, sssk, k1, yo, *yo, k1, k3tog, yo, k2, yo, sssk, k1, yo , rep from *, yo, k1, k3tog, yo, k1.
Row 28: Repeat row 4.
Row 29: (Ssk, yo) x 2, k1, *k1, (yo, k2tog) x 2, (ssk, yo) x 2, k1 , rep from *, k1, (yo, k2tog) x 2.
Row 30: Purl.
Row 31: Yo, ssk, k3, *k3, k2tog, yo x 2, ssk, k3 , rep from *, k3, k2tog, yo.
Row 32: Repeat row 6.
Row 33: Yo, k2tog, yo, ssk, k1, *k1, k2tog, yo, ssk, yo x 2, k2tog, yo, ssk, k1 , rep from *, k1, k2tog, yo, ssk, yo.
Row 34: Repeat row 6.
Row 35: 1/1 RC, k1, ssk, yo, *yo, k2tog, k1, 1/1 LC, 1/1 RC, k1, ssk, yo , rep from *, yo, k2tog, k1, 1/1 LC.
Row 36: Repeat row 4.
Row 37: K2, k2tog, yo, k1, *k1, yo, ssk, k1, 1/1 RC, k1, k2tog, yo, k1 , rep from *, k1, yo, ssk, k2.
Row 38: Purl.
Row 39: K1, k2tog, yo x 2, k2tog, *ssk, yo x 2, ssk, k2, k2tog, yo x 2, k2tog , rep from *, ssk, yo x 2, ssk, k1.
Row 40: Repeat row 24.
Row 41: K2tog, yo, k3, *k3, yo, ssk, k2tog, yo, k3 , rep from *, k3, yo, ssk.
Row 42: Purl.
Row 43: Repeat row 21.
Row 44: Purl.

Book review of Sequence Knitting.

Book Review: Sequence Knitting

For my birthday this year, I bought myself two books I’ve been yearning for: Sequence Knitting and the KNITSONIK Stranded Colourwork Sourcebook. Both have to do, in rather different ways, with demystifying particular design processes, though sequence knitting is also a new method for knitting complicated patterns using extremely easy-to-memorize methods. I am pleased as can be with both these books. I’ve already learned a lot from both of them. I have so much to say about each of them that I can’t possibly review them both in one post.

Sequence Knitting: Simple Methods for Creating Complex Reversible Fabrics, by Cecelia Campochiaro. Sunnyvale, CA: Chroma Opaci, 2015. ISBN: 9780986338106,  website: sequenceknitting.com, on Ravelry: Sequence Knitting

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Fruitbat encoded on a chart that can be used in any craft that is based on a grid.

Fruitbat encoded as a chart for use in any craft that uses a grid for layout

Earlier today I posted a lace knitting chart for fruitbat. Here’s a chart that can be used for any craft – quilting, cross stitch, crochet, needlepoint, colorwork in knitting… the sky’s the limit. Enjoy!

Fruitbat encoded on a chart that can be used in any craft that is based on a grid.If you like my posts like this, please consider supporting me on Patreon. Thanks!

Fruitbat encoded as a lace knitting stitch.

Fruitbat: a free lace knitting stitch pattern.

As many of you know, each month my Patreon supporters  suggest words for me to encode; I usually choose one randomly and then post the resulting stitch pattern on the first of the month. It’s good fun and I enjoy it. This month, the random number generator pulled up Katherine’s suggestion of fruitbat, which made me rather gleeful. For one thing, I like fruitbats; they’re quite charming. For another, it reminds me of Terry Pratchett and the Century of the Fruitbat.

In any case, while the word itself sounds a little silly to me, the appearance of the stitch pattern has little to do with the sound or meaning of the word it’s based on. And here we are, one lacy stitch pattern that pleases me. (Later today I will post another encoding of the word as a chart usable for many crafts.)
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On learning, and fear of failure

I wasn’t going to post today, since I made the Tau Day post yesterday. But I’ve been thinking about writing a post encouraging people to embrace mistakes and go ahead and try things they want to do even if they think they can’t do them. And I just read a post by Tien Chu that says much of what I wanted to say, only better. (Hm, maybe I should take my own advice.) Anyway, I think everyone should go read it: On Developing Skills. Here’s a quote:

Don’t let the fact that your early work sucks bother you. It’s going to suck. It’s good that it sucks, because if you can let go of needing to be good at it, you can get on with the real work, which is improving the skills that you’ll need to produce better work. As a weaving teacher I know tells her students, “Don’t worry about making the first piece perfect. You’re not making a scarf – you’re making a weaver.”

I may yet write my own post about this, but it’s a cornerstone of the way I go about exploring my work with yarn, and other things too.